openyetunbroken

lacigreen:

joponyhere:

lillianloverly:

THIS IS A PSA

THIS APP IS CALLED SAFETREK AND IS ABSOLUTELY INVALUABLE TO ANYONE WALKING ANYWHERE WHERE THEY DONT FEEL SAFE

YOU ENTER YOUR INFO AND SET A PIN AND THEN WHENEVER YOU DONT FEEL SAFE, YOU HOLD DOWN THE BLUE BUTTON UNTIL YOU DO

ONCE YOU RELEASE THE BUTTON, YOU HAVE 10 SECONDS TO ENTER YOUR PIN, AND IF YOU DONT THE POLICE WILL BE NOTIFIED OF YOUR LOCATION AND DISTRESS CALL

I TRULY BELIEVE THIS APP CAN HELP SOMEONE OUT THERE SO PLEASE DOWNLOAD IT

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safetrek/id716262008?mt=8

signal boost the shit out of this

THIS IS AMAZING SPREAD THE WORD

Reblog forever

openyetunbroken
dubihyena:

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

You may also note that the angle of Lavoisier’s leg and the crease in the tablecloth form a triangle which further bring the viewer’s attention to the central subject of Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze. Triangles are very important directional cues in paintings, and I see at least two more in this painting which also accomplish this.

dubihyena:

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

You may also note that the angle of Lavoisier’s leg and the crease in the tablecloth form a triangle which further bring the viewer’s attention to the central subject of Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze. Triangles are very important directional cues in paintings, and I see at least two more in this painting which also accomplish this.

openyetunbroken

lettersfromtitan:

sushigrade:

Just watch it, dammit

This is absolutely worth 19 seconds of your life.

openyetunbroken

nonlinear-nonsubjective:

badwolf405:

bemusedlybespectacled:

cagdahl:

bethifer:

seesyourlies:

andythanfiction:

It has come to my attention that there are fully legal adults who are not familiar with this, who do not know what to do when they hear it, and indeed, were born after it came out.  

This is unacceptable.

It is irrevocably tattooed into the brain of anyone vaguely associated with Western culture who was old enough to form cognizant memories in the mid 90s.  And yes, we can all do the dance.  I guarantee you Dean Winchester can do the dance.  Bobby can do the dance.  Sherlock can do the dance.  Tony Stark has made sure all his robots can do the dance.  

And all of you over the age of 25 already know what it is before you press play.

I REMEMBER THIS.

My Brain: This better not be what I think it’s gonna be.
It: *is what I thought it was going to be*
Me: *throws things out the window* 

There are people who don’t know this song??

HOW CAN YOU NOT KNOW HOW TO DO THE DANCE

Wait a minute- SOME PEOPLE DONT KNOW THIS?????????

I WAS AT MY COUSIN’S WEDDING AND ALL THE NEW IN-LAWS WERE FOUR BEATS OFF THE ENTIRE TIME AND MY SISTER AND I NOW HAVE A DEEP MISTRUST OF THEM